Anxiety: An Opportunity to Support Advocacy and Coping

Anxiety: An Opportunity to Support Advocacy and Coping

School can be a stressful experience for many children, neurodivergent and not. Parents and other adults who have been through school themselves at some point may find themselves tempted to respond to anxieties with platitudes meant to reassure the child that things will be ok. Often, however, these reassurances take on more of a gaslightingRead more about Anxiety: An Opportunity to Support Advocacy and Coping[…]

Supporting Neurodiversity Means Supporting Neurodivergent Leaders

Supporting Neurodiversity Means Supporting Neurodivergent Leaders

Thirty years ago, the students of Gallaudet University demanded that its newly-selected president resign. She had been the only hearing person among three candidates for the position of president at the nation’s only university designed for Deaf students. The students wondered how a university that claimed to develop Deaf people into leaders could be soRead more about Supporting Neurodiversity Means Supporting Neurodivergent Leaders[…]

Your Child Deserves Neurodivergent Community

Your Child Deserves Neurodivergent Community

When parents learn that their children are neurodivergent, they are often advised to keep their children away from neurodivergent peers as much as possible. That is horrible advice. Keeping away from neurodivergent peers is only good advice if your goals include reducing a child’s self-esteem and self-understanding. (Although, in that case, “get some less abusiveRead more about Your Child Deserves Neurodivergent Community[…]

Nurturing Neurodiversity

Nurturing Neurodiversity

Neurodiversity is a fact. People of all kinds of neurotypes inhabit this world. Like all kinds of diversity, neurodiversity means more perspectives, a wider array of strengths, and increased opportunities for mutualistic interdependence. Yet, many interventions and ideologies still blatantly disrespect neurodiversity. Treating neurodiversity as anything less than a fact does not change the factRead more about Nurturing Neurodiversity[…]

Universal Design and the Spirit of the ADA

Universal Design and the Spirit of the ADA

Don’t be fooled by watered-down versions of disability history: the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act was radical. Amidst a world that is designed primarily to suit the convenience of able-bodied, neurotypical people, a law that focused on making it accessible to people with disabilities did not float naturally into the public sphere. ItsRead more about Universal Design and the Spirit of the ADA[…]

Functioning Labels: A Lost Opportunity

Functioning Labels: A Lost Opportunity

“‘High functioning’ is used to deny support. ‘Low functioning’ is used to deny agency,” points out Autistic activist Ellen Murray. Research shows that in addition to being rather inaccurate in summarizing abilities and needs, stigmas surrounding functioning labels negatively affect the perspectives of many service providers. So why use them, especially when there are betterRead more about Functioning Labels: A Lost Opportunity[…]